Dmitry Morozov: Blood (and) Music

I mention The Rolling Stones’ “Let it Bleed” in a previous post (that wordpress ate an is now here), and so I began to think about music and blood. The word “blood” is often a flashy attention-grabber in any title, be it book, film, art, or piece of music. Does music explain blood or its relation to blood? Should it? In this post I look at some (in)famous examples of music about blood, and then discuss a new art installation that goes far beyond all of them. Continue reading

Inaugural Gore: Blood and the Birth of a Presidency?

Today, January 20, 2017, Donald J. Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. His inaugural speech offered surprisingly few novel thoughts, instead echoing stump speeches of his campaign. Some of the perhaps grander moments of the speech aimed for a lofty nationalism as the umbrella for a unified US. Politics aside, the bloody images in the speech offer a surprisingly clear vision of how Trump conceives of the nation.

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Bloody Art: Menstrual Artists, Trump, and the Material Image

Since my last discussion of this topic over a month ago the anger over Trump’s misogyny has not subsided. While few likely voters were swayed and probably no opponent convinced by his derogatory views on women, some have channeled their anger into something more than a tweet.

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Raving Nonsense: How to Spray Blood at a Party

So it appears that an someone has a neat PR campaign going on that involves blood. I will tell you at the end what it actually is all about, but I found playing along a fun project. Over the summer Vice and other sites noted an ad for a Halloween rave party in Amsterdam where the organizers will spray people with real blood. But how do you spray people with blood? Which blood? And how much is a ticket? What is this all about? Read on for the answers.

Close Up of Red and Clear Liquid Splash Crown

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Green Blood? Anthropocene, Hemoglobin, and the Politics of Plants

Nobody really knows why our blood is red.
That is a silly statement. Obviously since Swammerdam and van Leeuwenhoek we know that it is red, that red is the reflected spectrum of visible light on the surface structure of the red blood cell or erythrocyte. (Same reason, by the way, why our veins look blue…deoxygenated blood is dark red, oxygenated bright red, neither is ever blue.) Continue reading